Welcome
   Home | Texts by category | | Quick Search:   
Authors
Works by Aristophanes
Pages of The Frogs



Previous | Next
                  

The Frogs   


In the direst of straits; and behold at the gates,
The Ceramites flapped him, and smacked him, and slapped him,
In the ribs, and the loin, and the flank, and the groin,
And still, as they spanked him, he puffed and he panted,
Till at one mighty cuff, he discharged such a puff
That he blew out his torch and levanted.
CHORUS
Dread the battle, and stout the combat,
mighty and manifold looms the war.
Hard to decide is the fight they're waging,
One like a stormy tempest raging,
One alert in the rally and skirmish,
clever to parry and foin and spar.
Nay but don't be content to sit
Always in one position only:
many the fields for your keen-edged wit.
On then, wrangle in every way,
Argue, battle, be flayed and flay,
Old and new from your stores display,
Yea, and strive with venturesome daring
something subtle and neat to say.
Fear ye this, that to-day's spectators
lack the grace of artistic lore,
Lack the knowledge they need for taking
All the points ye will soon be making?
Fear it not: the alarm is groundless:
that, be sure, is the case no more.
All have fought the campaign ere this:
Each a book of the words is holding;
never a single point they'll miss.
Bright their natures, and now, I ween,
Newly whetted, and sharp, and keen.
Dread not any defect of wit,
Battle away without misgiving,
sure that the audience, at least, are fit.
EURIPIDES
Well then I'll turn me to your prologues now,
Beginning first to test the first beginning
Of this fine poet's plays. Why he's obscure
Even in the enunciation of the facts.
DIONYSUS
Which of them will you test?
EURIPIDES
Many: but first
Give us that famous one from the Oresteia.
DIONYSUS
St! Silence all! Now, Aeschylus, begin.
AESCHYLUS
"Grave Hermes, witnessing a father's power,
Be thou my saviour and mine aid to-day,
For here I come and hither I return."
DIONYSUS
Any fault there?
EURIPIDES
A dozen faults and more.
DIONYSUS
Eh! why the lines are only three in all.
EURIPIDES
But every one contains a score of faults.
DIONYSUS
Now Aeschylus, keep silent; if you don't
You won't get off with three iambic lines.
AESCHYLUS
Silent for him!

Previous | Next
Site Search