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Philoctetes   


PHILOCTETES
No; thy hand alone;
I will not trouble them; 'twill be enough
If they can bear with me and my distemper
When we embark.
NEOPTOLEMUS
Well, be it so; but rise.
PHILOCTETES (rising)
Oh I never fear; I'll rise as well as ever.
NEOPTOLEMUS (half to himself)
How shall I act?
PHILOCTETES
What says my son?
NEOPTOLEMUS
Alas!
I know not what to say; my doubtful mind-
PHILOCTETES
Talked you of doubts? You did not surely.
NEOPTOLEMUS
Aye,
That's my misfortune.
PHILOCTETES
Is then my distress
The cause at last you will not take me with you?
NEOPTOLEMUS
All is distress and misery when we act
Against our nature and consent to ill.
PHILOCTETES
But sure to help a good man in misfortunes
Is not against thy nature.
NEOPTOLEMUS
Men will call me
A villain; that distracts me.
PHILOCTETES
Not for this;
For what thou meanst to do thou mayst deserve it
NEOPTOLEMUS
What shall I do? Direct me, Jove! To hide
What I should speak, and tell a base untruth
Were double guilt.
PHILOCTETES
He purposes at last,
I fear it much, to leave me.
NEOPTOLEMUS
Leave thee! No!
But how to make thee go with pleasure hence,
There I'm distressed.
PHILOCTETES
I understand thee not;
What means my son?
NEOPTOLEMUS
I can no longer hide
The dreadful secret from thee; thou art going
To Troy, e'en to the Greeks, to the Atreidae.
PHILOCTETES
Alas! what sayest thou?
NEOPTOLEMUS
Do not weep, but hear me.
PHILOCTETES
What must I hear? what wilt thou do with me?
NEOPTOLEMUS
First set thee free; then carry thee, my friend,
To conquer Troy.
PHILOCTETES

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